ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES

Academic Activities: May 2020

National Webinars by NMAP members: National webinars were conducted by NMAP members, where through the dIAP platform, learning was continued and spread at National level. 

Our NMAP members took a number ofnational webinars in the month of May 2020. 

  • 1st May 2020
    I think my child has ADHD- Pediatrician’s role in ADHD management.
    Moderator : Dr. Leena Deshpande
  • 9th May 2020
    Paediatricians Awareness- Biological warfare: Preparedness.
    Expert: Dr. Nimain Mohanty
  • 11th May 2020:
    Nutrition and Brain: Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 20th May 2020: Hexavalent vaccines- Focus on Polio Protection
    Expert: Dr. Vijay Yewale
  • 22nd May 2020:
    Immunology of Vaccines :Dr. Vijay Yewale
  • 28th May 2020
    Communication Disorders in children
    Moderator: Dr. Leena Deshpande
  • 29th May 2020
    Infectious Diseases Special : Interesting cases
    Panelists: Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • Es(x)press-O with Dr. Shilpa Aroskar
    Dr. Shilpa Aroskar and Dr. Subash Rao

National Webinars For Parents moderated by NMAP member, Dr. UpendraKinjawadekar

Navi Mumbai IAP member ,Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekarmoderated many webinars for parents under the Haath mein haath, bacchonkibaat, IAP keSaathinitiative by IAP:

  • 1st May 2020
    Discipline: A Bridge between Goal and Achievement
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 2nd May 2020
    How to Handle Medical Emergencies in School
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 4th May 2020
    Growing Challenges in Girl Child 
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 5th May 2020
    Discipline: How to Improve Memory and Empower Brain
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 6th May 2020
    Non Communicable Diseases in Children
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 7th May 2020
    Skills for 21st century kids
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 8th May 2020
    Gender and Sexuality Education: Role of Parents and Teachers
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 9th May 2020
    National webinar for parents by IAP
    Sports for Children : Medicine, Fitness and Beyond
    Moderator: Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar
  • 16th May 2020
    Dancing letters and specific learning disabilities
    National webinar for parents by IAP Dr. Upendra Kinjawadekar

Haath mein haath, bacchonkibaat, IAP keSaath  NATIONAL WEBINARS FOR PARENTS MODERATED BY DR. UPENDRA KINJAWADEKAR

Webinars At Branch Level

Many Navi Mumbai IAP Members took webinars at branch level and even for other branches on varied topics. The lockdown could not stop our enthusiasm and learning was continued even when everything was under lockdown.

  • 2ND MAY 2020
    FUTURE OF DIGITAL HEALTHCARE :DR. A.K SINGAL
  • 13TH MAY 2020
    MANAGING CATCH UP VACCINATION IN COVID19 SITUATION AND OVERVIEW OF PRIMARY AND BOOSTER DTP VACCINES: DR. JEETENDRA GAVHANE
  • 15TH MAY 2020
    PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INTERESTING CASE SCENARIO: DR. UPENDRA KINJAWADEKAR
  • 16TH MAY 2020
    PRACTICE PREPAREDNESS DURING AND POST COVID 19 FOR CLINICIANS :DR. VIJAY YEWALE
  • 17TH MAY 2020
    LOCALISATION OF LESIONS IN CNS- BASICS AND BEYOND: DR. SHEKHAR PATIL
  • 23RD MAY 2020
    MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC  COVID 19 : DR. VIJAY YEWALE
  • 24TH MAY 2020
    CHILD DEVELOPMENT IN THE COVID ERA: DR. ROOPA SRINIVASAN
  • 26TH MAY 2020
    BASICS IN RHEUMATOLOGY AND BEYOND: DR. VIJAY VISWANATHAN
    FOR PAT’S TELANGANA
  • 28TH MAY 2020
    VITAMIN D AND IMMUNITY: DR. VIKRAM PATRA

WEBINARS AT BRANCH LEVEL

Academic Activities: April 2020

National Webinars by NMAP members: National webinars were conducted by NMAP members, where through the dIAP platform, learning could not be stopped even during lockdown. 

Our NMAP members took a number of webinars in the month of April 2020. 

  1. Dr. Vijay Yewale and Dr.DhanyaDharmapalan , along with Dr.Suhas Prabhu took webinars  on ” Write Antibiotics Responsibly (WAR) module. It was widely appreciated as being an exhaustive and informative talk.
  2. Dr. Pankaj Deshpande took a webinar on ” Recurrent UTI”.
  3. Dr. Vijay Yewale was one of the speakers on the webinar on ” New Questions on new vaccines and New Questions on Older vaccines”.
  4. Dr. Leena Deshpande took a webinar  on” Early Markers of Developmental Delay”.
  5. Dr.ArbinderSingal spoke on ” Pediatric Surgery: A Primer for the Pediatricians“.
  6. Dr. Vijay Vishwanathan took a Webinar on ” Suspecting Rheumatological Disorders in OPD”

Pilot NTEP E Module:

Pilot NTEP E Module was conducted by Navi Mumbai IAP branch. The faculties, Dr. Varinder Singh, Dr.Suhas Prabhu, Dr. Vijay Yewale and Dr.DhanyaDharmapalanconducted the session flawlessly . All the new guidelines in diagnosis n treatment of Tuberculosis was covered and videos showing sample collection , either gastric aspirate or LN aspirate made it easy to understand.

Exhaustive n Interactive session during the lockdown ,a very important topic covered .As our NMAP President , Dr. Jeetendra Gavhane rightly said,” Corona thojayega but TB rahega”…this session trained us to handle Tuberculosis in all aspects. The session was an online teaching program  but the faculties took care to answer all queries promptly that it was nothing less than an  interactive session.

Academic Activities: February 2020

Central IAP Module on VIT D:

NRP Program in MCH, Airoli

Clinical meeting with Dr. Amdekar Sir

Academic Activities: January 2020

Clinical meeting with Dr. Y. K. Amdekar which was live streamed all across India.

‘TIP OF THE DAY’ for Navi Mumbai IAP Whatsapp group

Started ‘TIP OF THE DAY’ for Navi Mumbai IAP Whatsapp group related to the infectious disease and Antimicrobial Stewardship in routine practice:

Eg.32 .Tip of the Day* *16/2/2020*

Enteric fever is caused by either Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi. Clinical features between the two are indistinguishable. It is an important differential in fever without focus or sepsis or pyrexia of unknown origin.

Classically the fever gradually increases in intensity and frequency in the first week ( stepwise fashion) until it becomes unremitting. The child usually appears ill in afebrile period. Fever is associated with malaise, myalgia,headache, abdominal pain, loose motions ( constipation may be seen in older children),child may cough due to associated bronchitis.

On examination, child appears ill, may have coated tongue, mild tenderness on abdomen , tumid abdomen, spleen becomes palpable at the end of the first week.rose spots described in literature is seen in only 10 % as macular spots especially over the anterior abdomen in fair skinned after 1st week.

Relative bradycardia seen in adults is not a feauture in children. Toxicity increases in 2nd and 3 rd week. Delirium may set in. Complications such as intestinal perforation may occur after 10 days of illness. Myocarditis, shock, meningitis , pneumonia are other known complications.

Cbc: Hb may be normal. Severe anemia is unusual and one should suspect alternative diagnosis of malaria. In a toxic child especially after 1 week of illness ,severe anemia might suggest complication of intestinal hemorrhage.

Wbc may be normal to slightly reduced. Absence of eosinophils may be seen in more than 50% cases though normal eosinophil count does not exclude possibility of enteric fever. Leucocytosis is uncommon.

Platelets may be normal in the beginning and mild thrombocytopenia may occur by end of the week. Liver enzymes may be mildly raised. First to rise is SGOT followed by SGPT.

Investigations to be continued.
*Dr Dhanya Dharmapalan*
*Team IAP Navi Mumbai*
*55 Tip of the Day* *14/3/2020*

Two important criteria to consider when choosing empirical antibiotics in bacterial meningitis is that The antibiotic should be bactericidal And it should be able to penetrate the CSF barrier to reach the site of infection. ( BLBLI antibiotics like Amoxiclav, Piperacillin-tazobactam do not penetrate and cannot be used for meningitis).

Since the most common causes of community acquired bacterial meningitis above age 1 month are streptococcus pneumonia, Hib and meningococcal, the following is the recommended regimen:
*Ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg/day in 2 divided doses ( maximum 4 g/ day), plus Vancomycin 60 mg/ kg/day( maximum 4g/ day) in 4 divided doses.*
Alternatively, cefotaxime 300 mg/kg/day ( maximum 12g/day) in 4 divided doses plus Vancomycin 60mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses.

The addition of Vancomycin for empirical regimen is as per updated GOI national guideline 2019. It is based on evidence of increasing resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins of streptococcus pneumonia ( DRSP) in the CSF isolates in a large study ( 2008 to 2016) at Vellore. Pls note that DRSP rate has not increased in non CNS streptococcal pneumonia.

If on culture organism is found to be cephalosporin sensitive, vancomycin should be stopped. Dexamethasone addition is most beneficial for Hib meningitis ( and maybe for adult pneumococcal meningitis) and is to be given 15 to 20 mins prior to first dose of antibiotics. Since it is practically difficult to get the etiological confirmation so early and since antibiotics cannot be delayed, it is acceptable to give one dose prior to antibiotic in suspected bacterial meningitis. Further doses can be continued based on CSF reports. If Hib meningitis, dexamethasone is given as 0.15 mg/kg every 6 hours for 48 to 96 hrs.

There is no need to repeat CSF except if non response at 48 hrs, in penicillin/ cephalosporin resistant who have received dexamethasone and neonates. Causes of non response in a diagnosed case of bacterial meningitis are complications like subdural empyema , cerebral abscess, ventriculitis or drug resistance. Addition of rifampicin is considered if MIC level of cephalosporin is equal or more than 4 microg/ml, if child worsens on vanco plus ceftriaxone after 48 hrs, if dexa has been given or repeat LP shows bacteria.

Duration of antibiotics is 10 to 14 days. (Oral switch not done).
If specific pathogen is isolated, duration is 7 days for meningococcus and Hib, 10 to 14 days for pneumococcus , 2 to 3 weeks for grp B streptococcus , 3 to 6 weeks for Listeria and 3 weeks for gram negative meningitis.
Source: GOI National guidelines for antimicrobial use,2019

*Dr. Dhanya Dharmapalan*
*Team IAP Navi Mumbai*

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